Science Without Borders®

Science Without Borders®

Science Without Borders® is the overarching theme of the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation. It provides financial sponsorship of marine conservation programs and scientific research around the globe, and raises awareness of the need to preserve, protect and restore the world's oceans and aquatic resources.

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    Education

    Education

    • Our Coral Reef Ecology Curriculum is a great resource for students and teachers. Filled with lesson plans, videos, and interactive learning exercises, our education portal engages and inspires students to learn about coral reefs and to become stewards of this vital ecosystem.

    • We have announced the winners of our 2019 Science Without Borders® Challenge! Lesya Antoshkina from Ukraine is the winner of the high school category for her stunning artwork “The Bike We Ride,” which beat out fierce competition to take first place. The winner in the middle school category is Zeno Park from New Jersey, who at only 12 years old created the winning entry “The Place Where Fish are Free to Roam.” This international art competition is open to middle and high school students 11-19 years old, and we hope you consider applying next year!

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    Third place in the high school category of our Science Without Borders® Challenge goes to Tianyi Jia of New Jersey for “Water of Gaea.”

    Artist's Statement:
    "My painting is inspired by the goddess of earth, Gaea, who created all lives. There is a clear depiction of a water cycle created by three components: the sky, the woman, and the ocean. The woman’s white hair represents a snow mountain with icy water flowing down along her back, through the mountain range and finally meandering towards the ocean. The water in the ocean then evaporates and become the clouds in the sky. Moreover, the body of the woman is covered with seashells while her legs are covered by coral reefs; the seashells and coral reefs are what can be considered as important “decorations” of the ocean. The woman holds a sphere of water: Earth. The sphere is shown with the oceans on Earth as interconnected, with no barriers, no boundaries, and no borders."
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    Posted 23 hours ago  ·  

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    Worachet Phanthura from Thailand won third place among middle school students in our 2019 Science Without Borders® Challenge for his artwork “The Ocean Life.”

    Artist's Statement:
    "I want to convey that we should help protect the coral because coral is an important part of the sea, but if we can't protect it, the beautiful sea will disappear, so every country should cooperate to protect the beautiful coral reefs. I draw about coral reef conservation and restoration and cooperation in each country."
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    Posted 2 days ago  ·  

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    Benedict Tan Kuok Hau from Malaysia took home second place in the middle school category of the 2019 Science Without Borders® Challenge with his piece “The Bigger Picture.”

    Artist's Statement:
    "My artwork is centered around the interconnectivity of the vast ocean and how everything that lives in the ocean is crucial to the general well-being of marine life. The map in the middle symbolises how we, humans, are just a small component of a bigger picture - the gargantuan ocean where there are no barriers, borders or boundaries which limit movement. The explorer ship embodies all the rich history we have in terms of our discovery of the immense ocean. This historical connection is further accentuated in the wave designs inspired by the Great Wave off Kanagawa by Hokusai and also a whale, one of the oldest mammals in the world. To the right of the painting, a vibrant selection of coral reefs line the border, highlighting the beauty and uniqueness of the ocean. Furthermore, coral reefs are crucial to the ecosystem as they provide refuge and oxygen for many creatures. Heading upwards, the map of the earth demonstrates animal migration and trade routes, emphasizing the close relationship of the ocean with mankind and animals alike. A few seabirds are seen soaring above the sky, harvesting their food from the abundant food sources that the ocean provides them with. A woman is standing high above the earth, inhaling all the fresh moist air. This symbolises our dependence on the ocean for oxygen. Oceans produce about 70 % of the world’s oxygen, a key component of respiration in our bodies. Overall, my painting was targeted to depict the limitless oceans with no restraints at all."
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    Posted 3 days ago  ·  

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    The winner in the middle school category of the 2019 Science Without Borders® Challenge is Zeno Park from New Jersey, who at only 12 years old created the winning entry “The Place Where Fish are Free to Roam.”

    Park said he was inspired to create this artwork “because the world is becoming polluted and ravaged. We might be forced to live in a difficult situation if we do not change our actions.”

    Artist's Statement:
    “My artwork relates to the theme, "Connected Ocean: No Barriers, No Boundaries, No Borders" because my piece shows that in the ocean, organisms are free, while above ground they are stuck where they are at. The marine life in the background swimming represents that they are able to swim wherever they choose to go. Each fish, shark, turtle, etc. are able to swim as they please to because there is no border in the ocean. On the other hand, as represented by the underwatered islands, the places that organisms above sea level are able to live is heavily dependent on the condition of their habitat, their border. While animals are able to live in the safari, none can be found in the industrial area. In one word, this art piece shows that if there is no border in oceans, the marine life are free to go where ever they wish.”
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    Posted 4 days ago  ·  

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